1817 - Richmond, VA
25 NOV 1876 - Westmoreland, VA

Samuel Redman Hardwick

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Samuel was a farmer in Westmoreland County. He owned and operated Peckatone Plantation after the Civil War. He started the first tomato cannery in the area.

Samuel Redman Hardwick was born about 1817 in Richmond County. According to Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 his parents were John Hardwick and Mary. But according to Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940 his mother's name was Elizabeth. Virginia, Marriages of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1649-1800 and Virginia, Compiled Marriages, 1660-1800 both have records for John Hardwick marrying Elizabeth Morgan in 1798.

Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940 shows that Samuel married Rebbecca Marmaduke, bond dated June 15th, 1843 in Richmond County.

On the 1850 census Samuel R. Hardwick and Rebbecca are in Cople Parish, Westmoreland, VA. Samuel is a farmer with real estate valued at $3,500. Children listed are, Elizabeth 5 F, Mary 3 F, Lucy 2 F. Also living in the house is 25 year old William Dwelley. Samuel R. Hardwick is listed as a slave owner on the 1850 slave schedule.

On the 1860 census Samuel sounds to be a successful farmer with real estate valued at $6,500 and a personal estate valued at $15,330. The family is only listed by initial on the census form. R. 35 F, E. 16 F, L. 12 F, S.F. 6 F, and W. 1 M. The nearest Post Office is given as Kinsale. The 1860 slave schedule showed Samuel Redman held 18 slaves. No slave names are listed, only age and sex. He had four slave houses. It appears that Rebbecca passed away in the later part of 1860, her burial spot is unknown.

Samuel would have been 45 when the Civil War started and does not appear to have served. Samuel remarried to Susan Frances Bailey (1835-1876) on April 7th, 1863. At a time when many Northern Neck families were struggling with the impact of the war it seemed like Samuel was able to succeed. He was able to purchase Peckatone Plantation in the later 1860's. Samuel may have already lived next to the Plantation, a home now known as "River View" still stands on the Peckatone tract and is thought to have been built by him. According the Elizabeth Dos Passos' 1973 article in the Northern Neck of Virginia Historical Magazine, Samuel grew up near Carmel Church where his father had donated four acres of land to be used for the cemetery.


On the 1870 census the family is living at Peckatone, now served by the Nominy Grove Post Office. The value of Samuel's real estate has dropped to $5,000 and $850 in personal property, maybe due to buying the new property. Daughter Lucy is married to J.S. Redmond and they live with the family. A 16 year old black boy named Bonaparte Redmond also lives with them and is listed as a servant. Several black families live in nearby homes and have occupations like domestic servant and laborer. They may have been some of the same slaves from before the war still working on the plantation.

Samuel's farm also appeared on the 1870 agricultural schedule of the census. It showed that he had 200 improved acres and 58 in woodland. Cash value of the farm was $5,000 and value of farm equipment was $100. He had paid $200 in wages that year. He owned 3 horses, 10 milk cows, 5 working oxen, 25 other cattle, 24 sheep and 20 swine. The value of that livestock was given as $785. He had produced 100 bushels of winter wheat and 1,000 bushels of indian corn.

Samuel Redman Hardwick died in Westmoreland on November 25th, 1876 of pneumonia. According to Dalton W. "Dal" Mallory he was buried in a family plot on the "River View" property which was owned by the McCrea family in 2009. The burial plot has no stones but is believed to contain at least three graves other then Samuel; one young son and two young grandchildren of his. Samuel's first wife, Rebbecca Marmaduke, may be buried there as well.

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Sources:

  • Year: 1850; Census Place: Cople Parish, Westmoreland, Virginia; Roll: M432_980; Page: 287A; Image: 573
  • Year: 1860; Census Place: Eastern District, Westmoreland, Virginia; Roll: M653_1383; Page: 997; Image: 641; Family History Library Film: 805383
  • 1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules
  • Year: 1870; Census Place: Cople, Westmoreland, Virginia; Roll: M593_1681; Page: 235A; Image: 56503; Family History Library Film: 553180
  • 1860 U.S. Federal Census - Slave Schedules
  • Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880
  • Virginia, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1607-1890
  • Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917
  • Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940
  • Mallory, Dalton W. Westmoreland County, Virginia Cemeteries: Volume One. New Papryus, 2009.
  • Wolf, Thomas A. Historic Sites in Virginia's Northern Neck and Essex County: A Guide. Warsaw, Va: Preservation Virginia, Northern Neck Branch, 2011. Print.
  • Norris, Walter B. Westmoreland County, Virginia, 1653-1983. Montross, Va: Westmoreland County Board of Supervisors, 1983. Print.
  • King, George H. S. Marriages of Richmond County, Virginia, 1668-1853. Fredericksburg, Va: G.H.S. King, 1964. Print. Pg. 88.
  • Dos Passos, Elizabeth H. "Peckatone, Then and Now" Northern Neck of Virginia Historical Magazine. 23.1 (1973). Print.

Parents:


Spouse & Children:

  • Rebecca Marmaduke
    • 1825-1860

  • Elizabeth Catherine Hardwick
    • 1844-1908
  • Mary Emma Hardwick
    • 1845-1855
  • Lucy Virginia Hardwick
    • 1848-1894
  • Sarah Frances Hardwick
    • 1854-1933
  • William Nixon Hardwick
    • 1859-1864


Siblings:

  • Jane Redman Hardwick
    • 1799-1826
  • Mary Priscilla Hardwick
    • 1800-1855
  • Elizabeth C. Hardwick
    • 1803-
  • John Hardwick
    • 1804-1864
  • Hiram Hardwick
    • 1806-1878
  • William Henry Hardwick
    • 1808-1854
  • Felicia Hardwick
    • 1812-1879
  • Sarah Ann Hardwick
    • 1814-1898-
  • Juliet Hardwick
    • 1818-
  • Benjamin Morgan Hardwick
    • 1821-

Last Updated: 1/12/2020